Content Curated By Darin R. McClure & a few photos


The Master List of the Collaborative Economy: Rent and Trade Everything
February 24, 2013, 12:46 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

The Master List of the Collaborative Economy: Rent and Trade Everything:
A Research Focus: Collaborative Economy

My next Open Research report  (see body of work) will be on the Rise of the Collaboration Economy.  If you’d like to be interviewed for this upcoming report, please fill out this submission form.   In my career as an analyst, I often list out all the players in a category, announce a formal research effort, then publish a series of analysis, this is part of my continuing methodology.  I’ll also be presenting my findings as a speaker at LeWeb, whose theme “Digital Hippies” is directly themed on this trend.  Thanks to friend Loic Lemeur for triggering this idea.

[Collaborative Economy Defined:  A digital system that manages the coordination of buyers and sellers who offer and exchange used products and remnant services]

The Three Categories of Collaborative Economy Markets

Within this market, there are multiple use cases, right now, we see the following three categories:

Market Type Description Examples
First Collaborative Market Manufactures and business owners that are now offering products for rent or barter BMW and Toyota have made motions to offer cars from their lot for rent –beyond selling them.
Second Collaborative Market Often denoted as the “Used or Second Hand” market a consumer may offer to rent or lease of used products or remnant services. Lyft allows for any consumer to act like a taxi, and pick up members of the service.  Craigslist and eBay (disclosure: client) empowers the selling of used products, worldwide
Third Collaborative Market Barter, gifting, or non-currancy exchanges of used products or remnant services. Toyswap allows parents to exchange toys with other parents, rather than purchase products that their kids will outgrow. Giftflow encourages users to ask for what they need, then to help others in the future, paying it forward

Market Rises: Media Attention, Over $2billion in Funding

There’s been remarkable media attention on this topic as vendors like AirBnB, Lyft, Uber, and TaskRabbit have gained the attention of the media.  Even battles against this category have emerged in San Francisco, as well as in Amsterdam on unofficial places of rent.  We don’t foresee this space to go down, as cursory analysis indicates that there’s been a whopping $2billion in venture funding into this category, out of a sample of 200 startups.  A spin out from the consumer social networking category,  this movement will have significant runway before true winners are decided.
Disruptions to CPG, Retail, Service Industry Government

Also, there are extensive disruptions to companies who create products or services.   If this trend continues at the speed of current trajectory, it can force retail and product based companies to acquire startups in this space, or offer products in their own stores for lease or barter.  Furthermore, governments are displaced if the barter economy rises, and tax revenues are diminished as people share products –with no money exchanged.  Lastly, we’re seeing new forms of untraditional currency emerging, including peer to peer BitCoin which is not backed by any federal reserve note, nor precious metal –it’s backed by processing power.
How You Can Get Involved with this Research

  1. Submit a startup in the comments below
  2. Request to be interviewed for this upcoming Open Research report in this web form.
  3. Share this post with others.

List of 200 Companies in the Collaborative Economy

Using the spirit of this space, I contacted a TaskRabbit (thanks Rachel) to conduct significant research, over 22.5 hours to aggregate a list of startups in this space, from a variety of sources.   This database will be the primary source of a sample which I’ll use to parse out trends and data types for this upcoming report.

Summary and Next Steps

This trend is just getting started. Expect many traditional business models to be disrupted as these startups and large companies adopt new methods for deploying and consuming goods and services. Don’t expect more than 20% of these startups to survive as categories will expand and collapse in the traditional innovation market. I’ll keep a continued focus on this market trend over the coming future, please leave a comment with your thoughts and submissions.

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